Kuan Yin, the Albatross and a Prayer for Our Times

Devotion is the cultivation of a prayerful attitude within life. Contemplative prayer isn’t about asking for things, but is a still, open listening into “how it is” within a cacophonous world that is actually permeated with living silence. Our ability to figure everything out is limited. In prayer, accepting our limitations, we lean into that silence, which has a listening presence. One way to connect to the listening heart is through the practice of mantra. Mantra, which means to “guide and protect the mind,” is sometimes done as a concentration practice to help steady and focus mental energy. But mantra is also a heart practice that taps into the universal intelligence inherent within the matrix of consciousness, while at the same time transporting us beyond the mind’s labyrinth-like hall of mirrors.

When we are locked into states of confusion, overwhelm and anxiety and are left circling in our reactive mind, our mantra is “it’s hopeless, I’m hopeless”, which probably won’t get us very far. Instead holding a sacred name or phrase reminds us to soften, listen, trust, have patience, and reconnect to the authentic, innately inherent living Dharma. As the mantric word or phrase dissolves, we are returned to the mystery of intuitive depth knowing – the domain of prajna wisdom.

Namo Kuan Shr Yin Pu Sa, meaning, “I return to the one that listens at ease to the sounds kuan yinof the world,” connects us to the immeasurable listening heart and mysterious power of compassion. We are not alone. The heart of the universe is not a dead, unfeeling space but is receptive, responsive, intelligent. Feeling our hopelessness, compassion can arise, even for a moment. Mercy and love can be there, for ourselves, for it all, for the enormity of our collective disaster. Prayer brings us to our knees. Right now, we humans need to humble ourselves before Mother Nature. We have to move out of our clever abstractions so we can recognise we are actually part of nature and dependent on her. Within the vast intimacy of innate, unbounded reality, we must glimpse the truth that all beings are resident in our awareness.

Compassion is not only gentle, it also calls us to stand up and be passionately aligned to the deeper call of truth. The extreme intensity of our current planetary emergency has fierce compassion within it. The kind of compassion that strips away our human hubris and the pretence generated from our narcissistic obsessions and delusions. After months of burning in the Northern hemisphere and deep drought in the Southern, we are being called to wake up…fast. We now know that every choice we make has an impact. Therefore, can we move from a place that recognizes our deep intimacy with all life?

A stunning recent documentary that helps re-connect us to the listening, knowing heart, the “intimacy of all things” which is the essential meaning of Kuan Yin, is the achingly beautiful Midway Project’s Albatross. It unfurls a meditative art experience that transports us into the story of a mythic bird, long known to the ancient mariner from sea-faring times of old. From the 10,000 mile food gathering journey for its young, gracefully gliding across the ocean where the Pacific Garbage Patch stalks, we are invited into the albatross’s power, beauty, and its metaphoric impact reflecting our collective challenge and dilemma.

Take time out to watch this. It will break open your heart. These days, we need our hearts to break open, we need to feel the grief of so much loss so we can shake off our complacency. So do please watch Albatross, it is a work of love. And do bring some friends together to watch it with you,* to discuss and to explore how to be part of the community of Earth Responders needed for our collective survival. Time is short and an urgency is upon us.
Kittisaro & Thanissara

To witness a young albatross open wide
its translucent, newborn throat,
open the soft, pink shell to its mother,
to the contents of the sea she carried
in her body for thousands of miles,
for over twenty million years – to watch, 
today, the chick wholly embrace
the amber-coloured squid oil
and cloaked shards of plastic,
to see it all slip down in an act
of ancient swallowing – it to witness
eons of trust absorbed into nature’s gut.
And for our own trusting throats
defended by lips, teeth and taste buds,
we evolved to sweeten what poisons us.

Victoria Sloan Jordon
“Midway V Poem – On Witnessing An Albatross Feeding.”

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Notes From the Botswana Road

We traveled for nearly a week through the Greater Kalahari, Makgadikgadi Pans, and Moremi parklands onto Savuti, the Place of Lions, over interminable dust, scree, and Csand roads as if the vehicle was riding waves, up and down, rather than the earth. Then the landscape suddenly changed. The Botswana landscape is mostly flat, but this was different. The geology and contours weren’t dramatically different, but the feeling was. Small rocky hills and Baobab Trees encircled us heralding the arrival into a deeply sacred space. It felt ancient. When we explored, there was a painting on the rock from 4000 years ago. It was the simplest art. An Eland, Elephant, Oryx Antelope (or Gemsbok), and Snakes. Essential meat and medicine for survival.

Tsonxhwaa, Savuti Marsh, Chobe National Park.

All through we had been traveling the lands of the San/ Bushman/  Khoisan “First Sitting There People” where we peeked through a timeless portal into a peoples who for 30,000+ years roamed this dry and brittle ground, rejoicing when the rains came. One day, bees invaded the camp looking for water. As we drove out, we saw the Oryx antelope dance. Rock, our Botswana guide, told us they felt the rains coming. And then the black water laden clouds swept in and dumped the rains. We weren’t prepared; our tents were washed out.

Once, a long time ago, when we were new to Southern Africa, an Elder Bushwoman told a friend that they, the San, were the peoples “on track.” That we, in contrast, in our modern world, were so off track, we didn’t know there was a track. She said that as they, the first peoples, crossed over from this world first, we would follow not so long after.

We all know we live under the terrifying shadow of a rapidly warming biosphere that is radically changing weather patterns and threatening sustainable life. Alongside this, the immensely destructive power in the hands of a few wracked by greed, hatred and delusion is endangering our collective well being. We have read and heard so many words and perspectives in response. We have anguished and put ourselves to task to try and step down the looming disasters. And while we must maintain hope and work for a sustainable, just, and equitable world, we too must remember, as the KhoiSan knew so well, that we are only dust on this ancient Earth. One day, the winds will blow our foot prints away too.
Kittisaro & Thanissara, notes from the Botswana road, 
Dharmagiri Ubuntu Tour July 2018

                               The Wind Intends to Take Away Our Footprints
Its name is ≠Koaxa, while the Europeans call it Haarfontein; and it was at Haarfontein that Smoke’s Man saw the wind. He saw the wind but thought it was a !kuerre-!kuerre bird, and therefore, he threw a stone at it, and it burst into wind, it burst out blowing, it blew hard, it blew fiercely. It raised the dust, and it flew away and went into a mountain hole: and he, Smoke’s Man, being afraid, went home. The wind was once a man, but he became a bird and wore feathers on his skin and went to live on a mountain. He became a bird and no longer walked, but he flew. He wakes up early and he leaves his mountain and he flies about, he flies about, about, about, about, as he flies to eat, and then he returns, he returns there to sleep; and because he feels that his feathers used to blow, he, too, blows. They were the wind and therefore they blew, and he, the son of the wind, is now a bird.
So said /Han≠kasso.

Leaving.
We are leaving.
Shredded and raw heart seeks calm shore.

We dream another shore waiting
and we need to know how to go.
Not flights of fancy
of awakenings’ glitz
floating eloquences
of enlightenment.
Tongue bright with witty rational
flowing from throat to head
shaping realities of transcendence
while in the core of burning samsara
swirling emotions
float free
on upward circling perceptions
divorcing themselves from our heart connection.

Ascenders into the light,
we descend before you.
An exhausted pile of bones
smouldering in cold ash
from words sliding sideways
in mega churches
preaching crazed dissonance non-union.

But here is the truth.
There is no heaven in the sky.
No nirvana apart from samsara.
No paradise virgin to your violence reward.
And no Planet B.

So sit the night patiently through
and gather your wayward mind.
Take up your own power
as in your heart
is the earth’s body
and all bodies,
the stars, mountains, oceans,
flowers, trees, cities and moon.

Sit until dawn, without flying to the light,
instead, plunge your life
into your unfathomable yearning
so you can be pulled to the intimacy
that this direct path heralds
within each beating heart
where every precious breath
redeems your lost soul.

And when preachers promise a far off place
challenge them
with your honest voice.

Can you dissolve walls of the mind
and into the undivided heart arrive
to stand up fierce
for our Earth
and her all living beings
?

Because from common ground
we move from birth into destiny
while death dream reality
and bone ash wait.

Because all is possibility
with no substance found.
Particles of no-thing-ness
transform into each other
in universal systems
of potentiality
where space, time, matter and light
forever melt like waking dreams.

The wind does thus when we die, our own wind blows; for we, who are human beings, make clouds when we die. Therefore, the wind does thus when we die, the wind makes dust, because it intends to blow, taking away our footprints, with which we had walked about while we still had nothing the matter with us; and our footprints, which the wind intends to blow away, would otherwise still lie plainly visible. For it would seem as if we still lived. Therefore, the wind intends to blow, taking away our footprints.
So said Dia!kwain.

Time with relentless harvesting
your precious human life
is short.
As all life
gathers proof of our faith
through the pilgrimage of the night
that tests the grounds of our being
so we may know
the measure of courage
and the wellspring of our heart,
from which we sip nectar.

Just as the brown, striped bug
drinks from the white elderflower,
and the orange, thin-winged butterfly
skips through ochre grasses,
and the grey, knowing wolves
move through cold, white snow,
and the rhinos through dry, bush veldt go
as lions stalk impala
along the river slow.

Slow is the Earth’s rhythm,
deep and unfathomable in our collective soul.
The rhythm of the days tick-tock,
winding through the web of our connection
of Internet consumption
where we search what we hope to know.

But to truly know is to not know.
And to not know
is so much evidence of where faith can go.

And even when the realms of empty space are exhausted, the realms of living beings are exhausted, the karmas of living beings are exhausted, and the afflictions of living beings are exhausted, we will still accord with this, our deepest heart, endlessly, continuously, without cease. Our body, speech and mind never weary of service to living beings and to this great Earth. So whispers our true heart.
                               Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate Bodhi Svaha

 

AA

B

Extract from The Heart of the Bitter Almond Hedge Sutra by Thanissara, written at Dharmagiri Sacred Mountain Retreat KwaZulu Natal, 2013, which includes extracts from The First Bushman’s Path, stories, songs and testimonies of the /Xam by Alan James, University of Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg 2001 SA.
Photos – Thanissara
Baobab Tree of Life, Animal KoiSan Paintings, Savuti Lions, Chobe Park, Botswana
Community KoiSan Painting – Garden Castle Park, Southern Drakensberg, Underberg.

Dharmagiri – AGM August 12

Précis of Dharmagiri Vision Meeting, facilitated by Nobantu

The morning began with an exercise introduced and guided by Nobantu – of each person writing down points, on small pieces of paper, about their sense of
1) what is working at Dharmagiri?
2) why does Dharmagiri exist – what does it offer?
3) so where to from here?
After looking at all the points which were put up on the walls, we divided into three groups to synthesize this input.

The input about what is working at Dharmagiri included comments about the blessing of dharma protectors, the beauty and sacredness of its mountain location, as well as the retreat centre being a sanctuary and spiritual home where there is a sense of sangha and community, an established and well-maintained place that is not to big where people can practice, grow, heal and find silence, peace and compassion. The depth of dharma in the teachings, especially Kittisaro and Thanissara’s teachings which include eclectic Buddhist perspectives, as well as the availability of international, resident and local teachers, the encouragement of diversity and openness, flexibility and openness to change, as well as an availability of overseas financial support were also noted, as were Dharmagiri’s reputation, authenticity, generosity, goodwill and willingness.

The synthesis of this input by one of the sub-groups reads as follows:

“The stable and vigilant mountain; a spiritual home and sanctuary where healing, love and compassion are natural. Dharmagiri is well maintained and a place where groups and spiritual friends can meet and it is a strong and effective source of dharma.”

A further synthesis reads:

“The mountain is a source of nourishment and guidance for all of us: the space is sacred, holds and protects us. There is a committed core group of teachers and sangha members, who are demonstrating flexibility and openness to change. Relationships with local communities have been established and can be deepened over time; there is a feeling of good will that can be nourished in turn to do much more. The space has a feeling of authenticity, generosity, and a depth of dharma teaching that has manifest a particular ethos of the sacred mountain that is accepting of so many different pathways and ideas. The small community has nurtured this, and a reputation has been built around this authenticity.”

The input on why Dharmagiri exists – what it specifically offers – included comments in the areas of Dharmagiri being a refuge; a place for practice, healing and transformation; a place that models a way of being; and a place from where spirituality can be integrated into the world. Firstly as a refuge, Dharmagiri provides a spiritual home, a hermitage, a sanctuary, a safe place; secondly, as a place for practice and healing, Dharmagiri develops love, compassion, reflection, insight and facilitates personal, social and nature-related healing, and offers a space where it is okay to acknowledge our suffering and develop a way of relating to it, and a space where the pain and separation from apartheid can be healed; thirdly, as a place that models a way of being –compassion, generosity, wisdom, awareness and inclusion are modelled through the teachings; and lastly, as a place where spirituality can be integrated into the world, Dharmagiri demonstrates a deepening of spirituality and a way to build bridges from there into the world.

The synthesis of this input by the second sub-group reads as follows:

“We come for enrichment, for peace, for personal growth and for friendship”.

A further synthesis reads:

“We begin with honouring a legacy of inclusive sacredness in people, tradition, and place, which includes depth of practice, teachers, intentionality, and influence. Qualities, values, experiences and practices that support this include authenticity, nurturing, compassion, love, wisdom, generosity, sparkliness 🙂. These qualities emerge through and in this location: through connection, through experiencing the sacredness of ancient place, and through sangha.

DG is a place and a space that enables transformation, healing, liberation, refuge and re-membering through depth-practice, relationship and self-knowledge. With that comes an inner purpose for all those who to come to this place, and from there a relationship with community and community purposes: this includes bridgebuilding, mending structural violence and the actions that emerge from those processes, in friendship, and in healing.”

Input contributions on the question of ‘so where to from here?’ included continuing to offer depth practice and healing through offering mainly longer retreats and self retreats but including a few introductory retreats as well, and by building sangha through involvement and communication, continuing to involve local people, and reaching out to more black Africans and more young people. A focus on developing an African view of the dharma, or what some referred to as ‘Afro-dharma’ including an honouring of indigenous spiritual traditions, was also mentioned as well as continuing to offer a place of dialogue and reflection on South African issues. Also raised was the offering of trainings using mindfulness in different contexts. The need to identify the core principles and guiding ethos of Dharmagiri, and the need for better marketing, communication and organisational structuring and support came up as well.

The synthesis of this input by the third sub-group reads as follows:

“Dharmagiri offers an environment of simplicity, a sense of belonging, bonding, a feeling of coming home. It encourages dropping social niceties, being real, and working with suffering. Dharmagiri’s space generates an ethos conducive to sharing authentic communication and practice of awakening. A lack of hierarchy, being inclusive, grounded in heart space, generosity, and a desire to help are foundational. Dharmagiri should stay small perhaps with an ability to host small groups. It should not over develop or become focused on making money and growing.”

Having completed this process, a general discussion about Dharmagiri’s vision statement concluded by delegating the task of formulating the vision statement to a sub-group. The vision statement that emerged read as follows:

Dharmagiri, nestled in the ancient and sacred presence of Mvuleni Mountain; and we, who practice, guide, and teach here, hold a dream that healing and liberation is the birth right of all. This is catalysed through contemplative practices and the transformation of consciousness that reconnects with the core of who we are, beyond the masks we wear, at the timeless level of our being.

The legacy of the sacred mountain and the long tradition of wisdom teachings enable the unfolding process of awakening from personal and collective wounding. This activates an innate intelligence, which guides our way home where we remember that we are loving and compassionate and as unique and authentic selves, belong together within the inter-connected and mysterious web of life.

After some later reflection and consideration, the final formulation of the vision statement for Dharmagiri emerged as follows:

At Dharmagiri, we hold a dream that healing and liberation is the birth right of all. Our focus is to catalyse this potential through contemplative practices that reconnect with the core of who we are, beyond the masks we wear, at the timeless level of our being.

The power of Mvuleni-Bamboo Mountain where Dharmagiri is nestled, and Dharmagiri’s legacy of Buddhist inspired wisdom teachings, enables a process of awakening from personal and collective wounding. As dysfunctional conditioning is released, our innate, intuitive intelligence is activated, guiding our way home so we remember that we are loving and compassionate, unique and authentic, and belong together within the inter-connected web of life.

For advertising purposes:

Dharmagiri Sacred Mountain Retreat is dedicated to well-being and the transformation of our individual and collective consciousness through insight meditation, mindfulness, and healing modalities.

Dharmagiri is on the border of South Africa and Lesotho near Underberg, KZN. It was founded in 2000 by Kittisaro and Thanissara, who trained in the Thai Forest monastic Tradition, and is guided by them, Chandasara, who also trained in the same tradition, a board of directors, and members of Sacred Mountain Sangha, an affiliated community of South African and International Dharma practitioners.

We offer guided silent meditation retreats, self-retreats, and a range of shorter retreats that promote physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual wellbeing. Within an ethos of open inquiry, we share teachings and practices that encourage the cultivation of mindfulness, insight meditation (vipassana), compassion, integrity and wisdom. We believe changing the world for the better grows from each person’s ability to access peace, clarity, and their positive creative potential.  

Various other topics discussed included what is meant by “Afro-dharma”, aspects of Dharmagiri’s finances, issues of governance and organisation, marketing and publicity, and programme issues.

Points raised in relation to “Afro-dharma” were that while much attention has been given to the East meeting the West in Buddhist practice, there has not been much attention given to the meaning of the East meeting Africa. There was a real passion to explore this. It was suggested that Dharmagiri host a workshop to explore this.

The need for a proper budget detailing all areas of income and expenditure was raised, including income from overseas benefactors, dana, fees, retreat costs, and teacher dana / fees. Stipends and general HR issues such as role, responsibility and decision-making definition, communication and accountability, and general conditions of living and working at DG also require attention.

Regarding governance and organisation, the possibility of having a ‘council of elders’ was raised. Such a council would play an advisory and mediating role and would comprise people who have been supporting DG for a long time but who are not immediately involved in its running. The need for a management committee including community residents to link to the DG Directors (all of whom are not currently resident at DG) was also raised. It was suggested that we consult an organisational specialist to help with structuring and clarifying these issues of governance and organisation. A committee to take the governance, organisation, and financial issues forward was agreed. Chris K, Jane P and Chandasara would take up that role.

While the need to look at marketing and publicity was raised several times, discussion was postponed in order to focus on other issues, so no decisions were made in relation to this aspect of DG functioning. At the moment Thanissara and Marlene are fulfilling this role and will be liaising with Peter who will be gathering and editing content for the website, newsletter, and DG Facebook page.

Regarding DG’s programme, it was decided to continue to offer longer retreats, self-retreats and to hire the centre to groups who are aligned with DG’s vision and ethos, for running their retreats. Offering nature connection retreats and insight dialogue based retreats including some focused on race and gender dynamics was also agreed. Developing further mindfulness based courses and linking the Jo’burg, Durban and Cape Town groups in more closely with DG and the American Sacred Mountain Sangha in relation to this, was discussed. Exploring “Afro-dharma” and linking this in to local groups and consulting with Sister Abe in this, was agreed.

A sub-group volunteered to meet in the evening to try to consolidate this discussion into a “way forward” statement that could be brought back to the larger group for discussion and agreement. The statement that emerged from this process is as follows:

The Way Forward
Dharmagiri Retreats

The focus of taught retreats offered at Dharmagiri will be aimed at supporting the development of depth practice rather than offering short introductory retreats which are already adequately provided by other retreat centres. In practice this means continuing to offer annual month long retreats as well as five and ten day retreats throughout the year. Between taught retreats, Dharmagiri will be available for supporting individual self-retreats, guided or self-determined.

In addition to retreats taught by Dharmagiri teachers, we will continue to invite outside teachers, both local and international, to offer retreats that are aligned with Dharmagiri’s vision and ethos, in areas such as, for example, Meditation, Mindfulness, Yoga, Healing modalities, and the Enneagram. We will also continue to offer Dharmagiri for use on request by outside groups that are similarly aligned with Dharmagiri’s vision and ethos.

Dharmagiri will continue to offer the annual Yatra retreat with a view to developing and expanding its orientation to include more of a conscious focus on raising awareness of our connection, relationship with, and care for nature, other forms of life and the environment. These retreats could involve, for example, walks in the mountains – not so much to walk as to sense and connect with the plant, insect, and animal life, the water, air, earth, sun, the history of the people who came before us through their paintings and other artefacts, learning from other cultures about their understandings of living in balance with their natural environments, developing awareness of the skies – the moon, stars, milky way galaxy and touching into how awareness of these has helped people plant, harvest, navigate, mythologize, find meaning in awe and mystery, and feel a sense of connection to something greater than ourselves. We could possibly walk out to spend a night in a cave as part of the retreat. All this would be held in a meditative space – exploring the relationship between inner connection and outer connection.

We also plan to continue to offer Insight Dialogue-based retreats both to deepen insight into the Dhamma and also as a safe and containing space for an ongoing exploration into our race and gender conditionings with a view to fostering greater understanding, empathy, and mutually enriching relationship. The term “Afro-dharma” came up during our AGM and these retreats could be a way of feeling into what is intuited with this term. Is there a connection between, for example, the philosophy and practice of Ubuntu and the kind of human relationship encouraged through the Sangha?

At Dharmagiri we will be developing some new mindfulness-based modular courses particularly looking into the characteristics of existence, and especially into the anatta or not-self aspect of the Dhamma. We hope that through these courses, and some of the retreats we will be offering, to draw in more younger people and more black Africans to join with us and share their perspectives as we deepen into a transformation of consciousness that takes us beyond our conditioning into the heart of who we truly are so that we may find each other there.

Resources Needed to Carry Out the Vision

  1. On the ground support: Housekeeper/Chef and Garden/Maintenance help.
  2. Clear role descriptions with responsibilities, accountability and communication lines clearly defined.
  3. More formally agreed terms of residence/employment at Dharmagiri including stipends, dana, leave, days off, etc.
  4. Help from a temporary organizational structure adviser/consultant to help us formulate a good practice organization model and process that fits our particular needs and circumstances.
  5. It was suggested that we establish a council of elders – a small group of people who have been long term Dharmagiri supporters and are not involved in the directing or running of Dharmagiri and who can advise, mediate and offer suggestions from an empathic and objective perspective.
  6. Additional buildings: A tremendous offering was made by Julian Kiepel last year, who examined the land in detail and made very helpful suggestions that would enable further buildings to fit within the requirements of land use in the Drakensberg. His extensive document is still being studied. Thanissara briefly shared a plan she sketched post conversations with stake holders as a spring board for discussion. There wasn’t time to look into this. Kittisaro and Thanissara have proposed a further longer meeting at a future date, over serval days to a week, with an interested group of stakholders to explore the building project.
  7. A financial committee to look into budgeting and local fundraising (Chris, Jane, Chandasara, Peter).
  8. An international fundraising committee (Kittisaro, Thanissara, Mike).
  9. A governance committee to secure a consultant as mentioned in point 4 above (to be included in the financial committee’s brief).
  10. A programming committee to schedule retreats and events, contact teachers, and manage the process of liaising with teachers, the office, and on the ground community members. Currently Thanissara & Chandasara, Marlene, Jane, advice from Sue.
21765425_2126251687392556_3757053509747761785_o.jpg

Our Team DG at the August 12th AGM. Back row, L-R Jane, Chris, Sue, Chandasara, Martin, Judy, Marlene, Moyra, Nobantu, Jess. Front row L-R Peter, Thanissara, Kittisaro, Mike.

 

Message from K & T, and Dharmagiri’s Vision Meeting, August 2017

Greetings from Kittisaro & Thanissara

K&T DG fire

K&T after helping to put out a fire in Dharmagiri Canyon with Martin and neighbours. August 6th, ’17

Some day, along the way, you realise you got older, and you are thinking less about life ahead and more about leaving something of value for those that follow. At such transitional moments it’s good to take a pause, which is what we did. We called it a sabbatical, but even though it was our first real break from teaching in 25 years, it was still a full year. We completed a move from the family home in Tennessee, after Kittisaro’s father passed, to a new base in California, while at the same time working with our Dharmagiri team to consider how best to support the running of the centre. We also took time for our own personal retreats, which were essential for recalibration, healing, and clarification.

We so appreciate the support we received during our that time and thank all who helped us. We were sorry we weren’t more present at Dharmagiri, or able to lead our usual retreats. However, we’ve been heartened by the work of Chandasara, Martin, Jane, Marlene, Chris, and Nobantu, who not only kept the wheels on, but are beginning to forge a more collaborative running of Dharmagiri. This is in line with it being time to shift from a founder led organisation to a community led one. We also thank Sue Cooper, Dain Peters, Nobantu Tsengiwe, Helen Altman, who have returned to teach at Dharmagiri over several years, alongside many other wonderful teachers who have offered their wisdom so generously at Dharmagiri.

For conscious engagement with the future, Dharmagiri’s Annual General Meeting in August  was important. It went a long way to clarify the vision of Dharmagiri and how we aim to apply it on a practical level. We thank Dharmagiri’s co-director, Nobantu Mpotulo, for facilitating such a heartfelt, wonderful, fun, profound, and creative process that produced the kind of results we were hoping for. Chandasara has put together a summary of the meeting below, which will interest those who support Dharmagiri.

As we both move into “what now”, it’s clear to us that Dharmagiri and our deep connection with South Africa since 1994, is woven into our hearts and is part of our future planning. We look forward to continuing our month long retreats, offering shorter retreats, and to spending time in the mountains, while also continuing to support Dharmagiri and our co-sangha members in S.Africa. This is our ongoing commitment.

Alongside that, our work in America has grown out of our decades of retreat work at Dharmagiri, which primarily enabled us to forge a synthesis of Theravada and Mahayana practice. The first flowering of this was the Sacred Mountain Sangha Dharma Training in 2008, which began as 3 five day modules over a year at Dharmagiri. With considerable help from Peter Woods (now Dharmagiri’s Offsite Service Provider), who spent that year at Dharmagiri, the training went online enabling people to access it locally, then around the world.

k&t oakland

K&T doing street protest, San Francisco

In about 2009 we created a small Non Profit in Tennessee called Sacred Mountain Sangha, which has now transferred to California as a 501(c)3. In September 2018, we will launch the core work of SMS USA, which is a seven module training over 2 years. You will be hearing more about this shortly through our Sacred Mountain Sangha newsletter, which you’ll have the option to sign up for, alongside Dharmagiri’s newsletter.

Before leaving you with Chandasara’s report, we wanted to encourage support for our emerging Dharma teachers at Dharmagiri. You may not of practised with them yet, but we highly recommend you take the opportunity to do so if you can. We are very grateful, in particular, that Chandasara, Nobantu, and Solwazi are stepping up to help us over the Christmas and New Year period so we can see Thanissara’s family in the UK and Ireland. Something that’s been hard to do at Christmas these last decades, as we usually teach at that time.

Team DG - Bots '17

Team DG 7 friends. Chandasara is 3rd from the right on the back row, between Martin and Jess & Ahmed. Next to Martin on the back row is Jane, Garth, Marlene, Kittisaro, Thanissara. Front row is Pip, Robyn, Peter, Moyra, Sister Abe. (At the Mind & Life Conference on Ubuntu, a Dialogue on Spirituality, Science & Humanity, Botho University, Botswana.)

Chandasara has a great depth and breadth to her understanding and practice of the Dharma from her monastic training, study of psychology, and deep interest in engaging and healing the particular wounds and challenges within the South African experience. Chandasara will be furthering her training in Insight Dialogue next year in the U.S.A. Beside supporting self retreats, Chandasara is also offering several taught retreats at Dharmagiri in the near future.

IMS POC TT '17

Teacher Trainees at Insight Meditation Society, U.S.A. Nolitha is far left at the back next to Joseph Goldstein.

Nolitha has a long Dharma practice background to draw from, is a psychologist and practicing therapist, and has just entered teacher training with Joseph Goldstein and leading Dharma teachers at Insight Meditation Society in the U.S.A.  Nobantu, who like Nolitha is a graduate from Spirt Rock’s 2 year Community Dharma Leader program, is in demand by the UN for her leadership training skills and understanding of group process. She now teaches all over Africa, the Middle East, and beyond.

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1. Xoli, Nobantu, Wapo

R-L – Wapo, Nobantu, Xoli at Dharmagiri

We’re also delighted that Solwazi Johnson, from Colorado, will be teaching at Dharmagiri. Solwazi has studied Dharma in Asia, has been on our retreats at Dharmagiri, and is a trainer with Intrinsic Resilience Training Institute, dedicated to teaching mindfulness and resilience skills to people in high stress occupations. Currently Solwazi is in teacher training at Spirit Rock with Larry Yang and Gina Sharpe. Solwazi will be leading retreats in Dec & Jan with Chandasara and Nobantu, which will also include walks in the mountains.

Very last thing to mention is the change of name that emerged from our collective process at the AGM. We are now Dharmagiri Sacred Mountain Retreat. All of us at the AGM felt it was important to acknowledge the timeless, powerful, benevolent, and inspiring presence of Mvuleni-Bamboo mountain as a major contributor to the transformative work at Dharmagiri. And, in case you didn’t know, one translation we like of Dharmagiri is Sacred Mountain!

We look forward to practising together again at the mountain.
Until then,
Blessings in the Dharma.
Kittisaro & Thanissara

T - '17  K - 2015

Précis of Dharmagiri Vision Meeting, facilitated by Nobantu

The morning began with an exercise introduced and guided by Nobantu – of each person writing down points, on small pieces of paper, about their sense of
1) what is working at Dharmagiri?
2) why does Dharmagiri exist – what does it offer?
3) so where to from here?
After looking at all the points which were put up on the walls, we divided into three groups to synthesize this input.

The input about what is working at Dharmagiri included comments about the blessing of dharma protectors, the beauty and sacredness of its mountain location, as well as the retreat centre being a sanctuary and spiritual home where there is a sense of sangha and community, an established and well-maintained place that is not to big where people can practice, grow, heal and find silence, peace and compassion. The depth of dharma in the teachings, especially Kittisaro and Thanissara’s teachings which include eclectic Buddhist perspectives, as well as the availability of international, resident and local teachers, the encouragement of diversity and openness, flexibility and openness to change, as well as an availability of overseas financial support were also noted, as were Dharmagiri’s reputation, authenticity, generosity, goodwill and willingness.

The synthesis of this input by one of the sub-groups reads as follows:

“The stable and vigilant mountain; a spiritual home and sanctuary where healing, love and compassion are natural. Dharmagiri is well maintained and a place where groups and spiritual friends can meet and it is a strong and effective source of dharma.”

A further synthesis reads:

“The mountain is a source of nourishment and guidance for all of us: the space is sacred, holds and protects us. There is a committed core group of teachers and sangha members, who are demonstrating flexibility and openness to change. Relationships with local communities have been established and can be deepened over time; there is a feeling of good will that can be nourished in turn to do much more. The space has a feeling of authenticity, generosity, and a depth of dharma teaching that has manifest a particular ethos of the sacred mountain that is accepting of so many different pathways and ideas. The small community has nurtured this, and a reputation has been built around this authenticity.”

The input on why Dharmagiri exists – what it specifically offers – included comments in the areas of Dharmagiri being a refuge; a place for practice, healing and transformation; a place that models a way of being; and a place from where spirituality can be integrated into the world. Firstly as a refuge, Dharmagiri provides a spiritual home, a hermitage, a sanctuary, a safe place; secondly, as a place for practice and healing, Dharmagiri develops love, compassion, reflection, insight and facilitates personal, social and nature-related healing, and offers a space where it is okay to acknowledge our suffering and develop a way of relating to it, and a space where the pain and separation from apartheid can be healed; thirdly, as a place that models a way of being –compassion, generosity, wisdom, awareness and inclusion are modelled through the teachings; and lastly, as a place where spirituality can be integrated into the world, Dharmagiri demonstrates a deepening of spirituality and a way to build bridges from there into the world.

The synthesis of this input by the second sub-group reads as follows:

“We come for enrichment, for peace, for personal growth and for friendship”.

A further synthesis reads:

“We begin with honouring a legacy of inclusive sacredness in people, tradition, and place, which includes depth of practice, teachers, intentionality, and influence. Qualities, values, experiences and practices that support this include authenticity, nurturing, compassion, love, wisdom, generosity, sparkliness 🙂. These qualities emerge through and in this location: through connection, through experiencing the sacredness of ancient place, and through sangha.

DG is a place and a space that enables transformation, healing, liberation, refuge and re-membering through depth-practice, relationship and self-knowledge. With that comes an inner purpose for all those who to come to this place, and from there a relationship with community and community purposes: this includes bridgebuilding, mending structural violence and the actions that emerge from those processes, in friendship, and in healing.”

Input contributions on the question of ‘so where to from here?’ included continuing to offer depth practice and healing through offering mainly longer retreats and self retreats but including a few introductory retreats as well, and by building sangha through involvement and communication, continuing to involve local people, and reaching out to more black Africans and more young people. A focus on developing an African view of the dharma, or what some referred to as ‘Afro-dharma’ including an honouring of indigenous spiritual traditions, was also mentioned as well as continuing to offer a place of dialogue and reflection on South African issues. Also raised was the offering of trainings using mindfulness in different contexts. The need to identify the core principles and guiding ethos of Dharmagiri, and the need for better marketing, communication and organisational structuring and support came up as well.

The synthesis of this input by the third sub-group reads as follows:

“Dharmagiri offers an environment of simplicity, a sense of belonging, bonding, a feeling of coming home. It encourages dropping social niceties, being real, and working with suffering. Dharmagiri’s space generates an ethos conducive to sharing authentic communication and practice of awakening. A lack of hierarchy, being inclusive, grounded in heart space, generosity, and a desire to help are foundational. Dharmagiri should stay small perhaps with an ability to host small groups. It should not over develop or become focused on making money and growing.”

Having completed this process, a general discussion about Dharmagiri’s vision statement concluded by delegating the task of formulating the vision statement to a sub-group. The vision statement that emerged read as follows:

Dharmagiri, nestled in the ancient and sacred presence of Mvuleni Mountain; and we, who practice, guide, and teach here, hold a dream that healing and liberation is the birth right of all. This is catalysed through contemplative practices and the transformation of consciousness that reconnects with the core of who we are, beyond the masks we wear, at the timeless level of our being.

The legacy of the sacred mountain and the long tradition of wisdom teachings enable the unfolding process of awakening from personal and collective wounding. This activates an innate intelligence, which guides our way home where we remember that we are loving and compassionate and as unique and authentic selves, belong together within the inter-connected and mysterious web of life.

After some later reflection and consideration, the final formulation of the vision statement for Dharmagiri emerged as follows:

At Dharmagiri, we hold a dream that healing and liberation is the birth right of all. Our focus is to catalyse this potential through contemplative practices that reconnect with the core of who we are, beyond the masks we wear, at the timeless level of our being.

The power of Mvuleni-Bamboo Mountain where Dharmagiri is nestled, and Dharmagiri’s legacy of Buddhist inspired wisdom teachings, enables a process of awakening from personal and collective wounding. As dysfunctional conditioning is released, our innate, intuitive intelligence is activated, guiding our way home so we remember that we are loving and compassionate, unique and authentic, and belong together within the inter-connected web of life.

For advertising purposes:

Dharmagiri Sacred Mountain Retreat is dedicated to well-being and the transformation of our individual and collective consciousness through insight meditation, mindfulness, and healing modalities.

Dharmagiri is on the border of South Africa and Lesotho near Underberg, KZN. It was founded in 2000 by Kittisaro and Thanissara, who trained in the Thai Forest monastic Tradition, and is guided by them, Chandasara, who also trained in the same tradition, a board of directors, and members of Sacred Mountain Sangha, an affiliated community of South African and International Dharma practitioners.

We offer guided silent meditation retreats, self-retreats, and a range of shorter retreats that promote physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual wellbeing. Within an ethos of open inquiry, we share teachings and practices that encourage the cultivation of mindfulness, insight meditation (vipassana), compassion, integrity and wisdom. We believe changing the world for the better grows from each person’s ability to access peace, clarity, and their positive creative potential.  

Various other topics discussed included what is meant by “Afro-dharma”, aspects of Dharmagiri’s finances, issues of governance and organisation, marketing and publicity, and programme issues.

Points raised in relation to “Afro-dharma” were that while much attention has been given to the East meeting the West in Buddhist practice, there has not been much attention given to the meaning of the East meeting Africa. There was a real passion to explore this. It was suggested that Dharmagiri host a workshop to explore this.

The need for a proper budget detailing all areas of income and expenditure was raised, including income from overseas benefactors, dana, fees, retreat costs, and teacher dana / fees. Stipends and general HR issues such as role, responsibility and decision-making definition, communication and accountability, and general conditions of living and working at DG also require attention.

Regarding governance and organisation, the possibility of having a ‘council of elders’ was raised. Such a council would play an advisory and mediating role and would comprise people who have been supporting DG for a long time but who are not immediately involved in its running. The need for a management committee including community residents to link to the DG Directors (all of whom are not currently resident at DG) was also raised. It was suggested that we consult an organisational specialist to help with structuring and clarifying these issues of governance and organisation. A committee to take the governance, organisation, and financial issues forward was agreed. Chris K, Jane P and Chandasara would take up that role.

While the need to look at marketing and publicity was raised several times, discussion was postponed in order to focus on other issues, so no decisions were made in relation to this aspect of DG functioning. At the moment Thanissara and Marlene are fulfilling this role and will be liaising with Peter who will be gathering and editing content for the website, newsletter, and DG Facebook page.

Regarding DG’s programme, it was decided to continue to offer longer retreats, self-retreats and to hire the centre to groups who are aligned with DG’s vision and ethos, for running their retreats. Offering nature connection retreats and insight dialogue based retreats including some focused on race and gender dynamics was also agreed. Developing further mindfulness based courses and linking the Jo’burg, Durban and Cape Town groups in more closely with DG and the American Sacred Mountain Sangha in relation to this, was discussed. Exploring “Afro-dharma” and linking this in to local groups and consulting with Sister Abe in this, was agreed.

A sub-group volunteered to meet in the evening to try to consolidate this discussion into a “way forward” statement that could be brought back to the larger group for discussion and agreement. The statement that emerged from this process is as follows:

The Way Forward
Dharmagiri Retreats

The focus of taught retreats offered at Dharmagiri will be aimed at supporting the development of depth practice rather than offering short introductory retreats which are already adequately provided by other retreat centres. In practice this means continuing to offer annual month long retreats as well as five and ten day retreats throughout the year. Between taught retreats, Dharmagiri will be available for supporting individual self-retreats, guided or self-determined.

In addition to retreats taught by Dharmagiri teachers, we will continue to invite outside teachers, both local and international, to offer retreats that are aligned with Dharmagiri’s vision and ethos, in areas such as, for example, Meditation, Mindfulness, Yoga, Healing modalities, and the Enneagram. We will also continue to offer Dharmagiri for use on request by outside groups that are similarly aligned with Dharmagiri’s vision and ethos.

Dharmagiri will continue to offer the annual Yatra retreat with a view to developing and expanding its orientation to include more of a conscious focus on raising awareness of our connection, relationship with, and care for nature, other forms of life and the environment. These retreats could involve, for example, walks in the mountains – not so much to walk as to sense and connect with the plant, insect, and animal life, the water, air, earth, sun, the history of the people who came before us through their paintings and other artefacts, learning from other cultures about their understandings of living in balance with their natural environments, developing awareness of the skies – the moon, stars, milky way galaxy and touching into how awareness of these has helped people plant, harvest, navigate, mythologize, find meaning in awe and mystery, and feel a sense of connection to something greater than ourselves. We could possibly walk out to spend a night in a cave as part of the retreat. All this would be held in a meditative space – exploring the relationship between inner connection and outer connection.

We also plan to continue to offer Insight Dialogue-based retreats both to deepen insight into the Dhamma and also as a safe and containing space for an ongoing exploration into our race and gender conditionings with a view to fostering greater understanding, empathy, and mutually enriching relationship. The term “Afro-dharma” came up during our AGM and these retreats could be a way of feeling into what is intuited with this term. Is there a connection between, for example, the philosophy and practice of Ubuntu and the kind of human relationship encouraged through the Sangha?

At Dharmagiri we will be developing some new mindfulness-based modular courses particularly looking into the characteristics of existence, and especially into the anatta or not-self aspect of the Dhamma. We hope that through these courses, and some of the retreats we will be offering, to draw in more younger people and more black Africans to join with us and share their perspectives as we deepen into a transformation of consciousness that takes us beyond our conditioning into the heart of who we truly are so that we may find each other there.

Resources Needed to Carry Out the Vision

  1. On the ground support: Housekeeper/Chef and Garden/Maintenance help.
  2. Clear role descriptions with responsibilities, accountability and communication lines clearly defined.
  3. More formally agreed terms of residence/employment at Dharmagiri including stipends, dana, leave, days off, etc.
  4. Help from a temporary organizational structure adviser/consultant to help us formulate a good practice organization model and process that fits our particular needs and circumstances.
  5. It was suggested that we establish a council of elders – a small group of people who have been long term Dharmagiri supporters and are not involved in the directing or running of Dharmagiri and who can advise, mediate and offer suggestions from an empathic and objective perspective.
  6. Additional buildings: A tremendous offering was made by Julian Kiepel last year, who examined the land in detail and made very helpful suggestions that would enable further buildings to fit within the requirements of land use in the Drakensberg. His extensive document is still being studied. Thanissara briefly shared a plan she sketched post conversations with stake holders as a spring board for discussion. There wasn’t time to look into this. Kittisaro and Thanissara have proposed a further longer meeting at a future date, over serval days to a week, with an interested group of stakholders to explore the building project.
  7. A financial committee to look into budgeting and local fundraising (Chris, Jane, Chandasara, Peter).
  8. An international fundraising committee (Kittisaro, Thanissara, Mike).
  9. A governance committee to secure a consultant as mentioned in point 4 above (to be included in the financial committee’s brief).
  10. A programming committee to schedule retreats and events, contact teachers, and manage the process of liaising with teachers, the office, and on the ground community members. Currently Thanissara & Chandasara, Marlene, Jane, advice from Sue.
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Our Team DG at the August 12th AGM. Back row, L-R Jane, Chris, Sue, Chandasara, Martin, Judy, Marlene, Moyra, Nobantu, Jess. Front row L-R Peter, Thanissara, Kittisaro, Mike.

 

Quantum Theory & Self-Reflection

 Listen to a Taster on Quantum Theory  with Gavin & Thanissara

Born of attention are all things.
The Buddha

The doctrine that the world is made up of objects whose existence is independent of human consciousness turns out to be in conflict with quantum mechanics and with facts established by experiment. Bernard d’Espagnat

The atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than one of things or facts. Werner Heisenberg

Click Here for: Info for Retreats below Sept 16-19 & Sept 30-Oct 4

Sometimes we need to shift set; to take a quantum leap from the daily grind and a world seemingly falling apart. At Dharmagiri, we are set to enter the world of Quantum Theory, designed to collapse the regular mind! Seriously, this leading edge science is so extraordinary that even the most revered quantum theorists say things like, “Anyone not shocked by quantum mechanics has not yet understood it.” (Niels Bohr.)

Yet…. it tweaks a whoa wow feeling, indicating that a quantum leap is not from but into’ deep reality. A long forgotten dream whispering like distant temple bells heard while walking along a winter beach calling attention to something….. important. (Poetry, it seems, is a language of the infinite. “We must be clear that when it comes to atoms, language can be used only as in poetry. The poet, too, is not nearly so concerned with describing facts as with creating images and establishing mental connections.” Niels Bohr.) We recognize something, even as we struggle to cognitively place its truths or compute its implications. We recognize the resonance of QT pointing to the primacy of consciousness, and there’s nothing more personally impersonal than that!

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   Gavin Roberston

We are delighted to have a competent and excellent guide into this territory who will be leading a retreat at Dharmagiri from the 16-19 September. Gavin Robertson is currently engaging a Ph.D. exploring the relationship between Vedic concepts of consciousness and Quantum Theory. Gavin, a psychologist, has guided many people (including traumatized youth), through transformational journeys and rites of passage in the wilderness (including the Drakensberg). He brings to his work a profound yoga practice, including experience of facilitation of Yoga Teacher Training in Uganda, Mozambique, and South Africa, and a long interest in integrating Western and Eastern psychology.

In this interview Thanissara (Dharmagiri co-guiding teacher), asks Gavin about his understandings of QT. What unfolds is a fascinating journey into the nature of light and matter, that all possibilities exist simultaneously, the determining factor of attention, shifting consciousness, choice, freeing ourselves from old assumptions and patterings, quantum insight into death, and more! Reality, it seems, is not what we thought!

Gavin will also be co-leading another retreat from Sept 30 to Oct 3 with Chandasara on a closely related subject, which is death and dying. Perhaps if we approach death with the insights offered by QT, and ancient wisdom schools like Buddhism and the Vedas, then our understanding of our lives would positively change. Chandasara will also be exploring very human experiences like grief when dealing with loss.

We look forward to seeing you at Dharmagiri for the leap!

**************   ***************   ***************

In the beginning, there were only probabilities. The universe could only come into existence if someone observed it. It does not matter that the observers turned up several billion years later. The universe exists because we are aware of it. (WHOA WOW!)
Martin Rees

And… try these on for size:

We now know that the moon is demonstrably not there when nobody looks.
N. David Mermin

I can’t accept quantum mechanics because I like to think the moon is there
even if I am not looking at it.
Albert Einstein

let go

Beyond Identity: Exploring Race & Culture in South Africa

What remains with me from this retreat is both a sense of the immensity of the task of bringing about healing and reconciliation in the relationship among races in South Africa, and a sense of respect for the courage and resilience needed in working towards that healing and reconciliation. It seemed apparent to me that we are all in need of restoration of our basic human modesty, dignity, and relatedness out of our respective internalized conditionings of privilege and oppression.

Friends, please take a pause from the busyness of the day to read this. We would like to share with you reflections from our retreat “Beyond Identity, Into Experience: Exploring Race and Culture in South Africa” which took place in June 2016 at Dharmagiri Insight Meditation Centre, KwaZulu Natal. The comments below are from our group, who journeyed together into uncomfortable territory; there we expressed and learnt important things — for ourselves, society, and for our world. Thanks for taking time with us as you read this, we appreciate your open-mindedness and authentic hearts.

beyond identity

Our small retreat community

Retreat leaders, Nolitha Tsengiwe and Chandasara, lay out the context of the retreat: 

nolithaUsing Insight Dialogue and meditation enabled the participants to engage an in-depth inquiry into the impact of growing up through Apartheid South Africa.

What was it like for you growing up in South Africa as Black or White, Coloured or Indian and when did you first experience yourself in terms of this identity? How did you perceive yourself and others of your own race, and how did you perceive people of different races?  How did you feel about your life as a person of your own race?  What did you think about the lives of other people of different races?

Are we ready for this dialogue?  Can we share our perceptions and experiences related to our racial identities on a personal level?  Can we go beneath the political, economic and ideological debates to explore and share the underlying personal experiences?  Can this lead us towards greater understanding and help us to cultivate empathy in our relationships with each other?

These were some of the questions it was hoped that this retreat would address by using Insight Dialogue as a meditative container for this process. Insight Dialogue is an interpersonal meditation practice which helps to bring the meditative qualities of spaciousness, mindfulness and insight into our interactions with other people. Insight Dialogue involves dialogues mostly in pairs and occasionally in groups of three or four.[1]

Each day began and ended with a period of silent meditation as did each Insight Dialogue chandasarasession. Each session had a particular theme or focus for the dialogues during that session and each session closed with a brief group sharing about the experience. The focus of the first session was on bodily experience in the present moment as a way of grounding awareness in the body and as an experiential introduction to the practice of Insight Dialogue. In the second session, the focus for the dialogues was on attitudes, views, beliefs and values that we have learned or become aware of from our families and cultures about other races as well as our own race. In the third session, the dialogue was a reflection on the morning’s practice and dialogues – reflecting on the use of the Insight Dialogue guidelines (see footnote above) and on what had emerged and remained present from the dialogues. The last part of the session involved partners simply being together and breathing together silently and observing this process of non-verbal connectedness.

The fourth session focused firstly, on reflections on what remained with us from the previous evening’s group sharing, and secondly, on our own personal experiences currently as adults in relation to our racial identities and those of other racial identities. In the fifth session the focus was initially on exploring the essence of the impact on us of growing up under Apartheid or its legacy, and closed again with dialogue partners simply being together and breathing together silently and observing this process of non-verbal connectedness.

The focus of the sixth and last Insight Dialogue session was on dreams and visions: having voiced our stories about our experiences and perceptions, how would we want these stories to change – how would we like them to be different now? What possibilities do we see? What could we change or do in our lives or environments that would help to make these aspirations become our reality?

Some comments, themes, and subjects that were raised during the group sharing sessions included:

  • It felt like there was so much to say and not enough time to say it all – as if there is a mass of built up material waiting to find expression.
  • The problem is big – much bigger than SA – it is part of a global system of white western patriarchal capitalism whose values have become the standard by which all else is evaluated, whether consciously or unconsciously.
  • Reflection on which is better – black culture or white culture? What has manifested as racism in South Africa was described as part of the globalization of white western patriarchal capitalism which privileges mostly white wealthy male minority elites. The problem of addressing race in South Africa was seen to be massive considering this wider context. Two metaphors used to describe this process in South Africa were the cappuccino metaphor – a sprinkling of black on top of a thick layer of rich creamy white resting on a large body underneath of plain black coffee; and a big pot of white western capitalism into which blacks are gradually being thrown and stirred up in. This dominant culture was described as seriously damaging the planet, climate, and people. This was contrasted with a description of black culture as being based on ubuntu – a sense of community, relatedness, wholeness, closer to the earth and caring for people.
  • The consideration of which is better seemed also related to a need to assert, affirm and reclaim the positive humanist values in races, cultures, and genders which have been denigrated, dismissed and undermined to counter the enormously damaging effects of internalizing this kind of conditioning.
  • How do we de-condition ourselves from conditioned inferiority and superiority? Partly by expanding our awareness of our own racial conditioning through exposure to each other’s worlds and worldviews, being open to feedback about our behaviour, and being willing to “sit in the fire” of the powerful emotions that such exposure can evoke.
  • What is the role of whites in this process of de-conditioning? It was suggested that instead of “supporting” the black struggle, whites should work on changing whites because that is where the problem is. It is not the role of whites to support the black struggle because that is just stepping into a power position again and thinking whites know what to do and how best to do it.
  • Whites who oppose racism have a strong desire to be seen as “good” whites – not being racist and being helpful and supportive of black initiatives to counter racism. Actually facing and addressing racism in the white community seemed to feel overwhelming – easier to support blacks than to work to change white racist attitudes.
  • The topic of white “collective suicide” was put on the table defined as meaning the death of the mentality that underpins racism.
  • It became apparent that ignorance about each other is vast – brought about through separation and enculturation – we are ignorant about each other and our respective communities. There were some moments of surprise – ‘oh, they are actually just like us’ or ‘I had no idea that there were serious disagreements in the white community about race – I assumed all whites thought the same way’.
  • The theme of the strong tendency to blame, punish, and justify was examined – the pervasiveness of blaming each other and justifying ourselves – and the unhelpfulness of this. When did it start? Whose fault is it? Who is responsible?
  • A sense of futility and disenchantment was expressed with dialogue and trying to change the other, trying to get them to understand. Why are we doing this? Does it get us anywhere? Are we just simply in the end all just tribal?
  • The assertion that all whites are racist whether they want to be or not was discussed. Because racism is a system that is perpetrated against blacks and not whites, blacks by definition cannot be racist – they have not created a system of oppression against whites. Blacks may be and sometimes are racially prejudiced, but they are not racist.
  • Strong frustration was expressed about the argument often heard that since it is already twenty years since the end of Apartheid, it is time for people to stop blaming Apartheid for things that are still wrong as if it is possible to wipe out the effects of 360 years of colonialism followed by Apartheid in only twenty years.
  • Political freedom has had very little effect on alleviating inequality and poverty – how can this be? What about economic freedom? Does Malema have the solution?
  • Corruption – what underlies it – what are the causes? – why don’t we look more at that?
  • The roles of love, hate, anger, perseverance and patience in this process of change. ‘You have to meet hatred with love – it will eventually erode all obstacles away’. ‘I wish I could be like that but I am so tired and disillusioned’.
  • A white sense of uncertain belonging in Africa and of lack of acknowledgement of white victimization.
  • Privilege – layerings and degrees of relative privilege – isn’t it inevitable – what is the alternative – a uniform society of everyone being exactly the same and having exactly the same? In addition to race, other factors such as personality traits, physical characteristics, sexual orientation, gender, language, accent, and many others are also gateways in certain circumstances to privilege.
  • Is education the solution or is this a myth? Does education inevitably open doors to wealth and status? Are wealth and status the goals?
  • Acknowledgement of the toxicity of ignorance, prejudice, harshness, rudeness, dismissiveness that have become entrenched in our society.
  • Differences in the older and younger generations of blacks – the tendency of older generations to keep racial awareness alive in the younger generations who are less conscious of racial identities.
  • The tendency through internalized oppression of blacks to see blacks who are successful as becoming ‘white’ and the inclination to want to hold each other down or back as a means of maintaining ‘black’ unity and identity.
  • Racism and the value of life – the ANC government does not value black lives or black dignity – still they haven’t provided basic necessities like water to many black areas – and this seems not to matter to them. These ANC leaders have internalized oppression and don’t consider black lives to be of any more value than the government before them.
  • Acknowledgement of the demanding role of black women in upholding the whole nation: nurturing black men in their undermined masculinity, being the peacemakers trying to help people to understand each other, historically looking after white children and then suffering later alienation.
  • The absence of black men on the retreat – why aren’t they here? Frustration expressed with black men being messed up – and expressions of empathy with them for having had their masculinity undermined in the past – not being able to fulfil their roles as protectors and providers living with their families – black children growing up without present fathers – boys not having masculine role models – and being subjected to humiliations from whites – not being able to occupy and live out their social roles. The experience of one black man was conveyed to the group – of being brought up with unconditional love which has given him the capacity for patience and living at peace with uncertainty. Thus there was some balance of both criticism and appreciation of black males.

Reflections from facilitators and retreatants:

Nolitha:  My most present feeling post the race dialogue is the feeling of gratitude and hope. I am hopeful and excited about what I observed in this retreat as capacity and willingness to ‘sit in the fire’ , engage from a place of vulnerability and courage, on such a hot and complex topic. Most energizing were emerging insights shared by retreatants that allowed for depth of understanding and expanded views/perspectives on the subject of race and identity. This for me enabled clarity of intention in doing this work. That I do this work to create safety to engage in ways that allow for self awareness for an expanded identity. It’s clear for me that our work is to see our blind spots, these relate largely to blindness to our conditioning. For black people it’s seeing how our internalized oppression keeps us in self-hate and self doubt and for white people it’s the blindness on privilege of whiteness that comes with superiority thinking that seems to say “I have the right view”.   My own experience of the retreat says we need each other as a mirror for growing our self awareness and awareness of the impact we have on each. The mirror becomes a source of insights and healing.

Insight dialogue as a tool enabled a deep quality of listening. Most of the insights seemed to surface with the invitation to share your experience of your speaking and share your experience of listening to the other. What I noticed is that it’s at this point in the Insight Dialogue process that people gain self-awareness, which becomes a doorway for an expanded perspective. This happens in an intimate relational space that Insight Dialogue offers. In speaking about your experience of speaking you see through your blindness or unconsciousness. Often an unsatisfying moment of really “seeing’. The beauty is that nobody has to point out your unconscious bias, you see it yourself.

It was an eye opener for me to hear retreatants noticing the difference in how we show up differently in the intimate space of dyads and how we show up in the bigger circle. My sense is that we are more real and open to being vulnerable in the dyads , whereas in the circle we can show up as being in a role. I know for myself shifting from time to time from the role of facilitator to being a participant allowed for a much richer experience. In the facilitator role I am aware of the responsibility of maintaining safety for all, a desire that all voices get heard. As a participant I can just be me.

I left the retreat with a warm sense of belonging, over just 3 days we created a community.

Chandasara:  What remains with me from this retreat is both a sense of the immensity of the task of bringing about healing and reconciliation in the relationship among races in South Africa, and a sense of respect for the courage and resilience needed in working towards that healing and reconciliation. It seemed apparent to me that we are all in need of restoration of our basic human modesty, dignity, and relatedness out of our respective internalized conditionings of privilege and oppression.

The sense of the immensity of the task of healing and reconciliation came from seeing some of the effects of having been so profoundly separated from each other over such a long period of history – that we have been so insulated from each others’ realities that we don’t really know much about the complexities of each others’ lives or know how to even begin to find each other. The legislated separation under Apartheid was in a sense only the tip of an iceberg: under that surface lies the vast psychological separation from where we view each other across chasms of ignorance filled in by supposition, projection, stereotypes, isolated experiences and perceptions, opinions and ideologies. How to communicate now without triggering rigorous defences against powerful emotions of bitterness and fear is an enormous challenge.

The respect for the courage and resilience needed in working towards healing and reconciliation came through feeling deeply touched by sincere efforts to communicate feelings and perspectives that were difficult to express and to hear, and by the willingness to return to continued interaction after experiencing difficult challenges and painful interactions. I felt very moved by the depth of pain and trauma expressed at times, by admissions of ignorance and changed perspectives about the lives and experiences of the “other”, by some very beautiful, generous and loving expressions of appreciation and magnanimity that were offered into the group, and by some informal demonstrations of mutual affection and bonding despite the pain and alienation of our history. In this I sensed a deep desire for healing and reconciliation and felt the potential for community to develop.

Participating in some of the dialogues in dyads I experienced an expansion of my own awareness of some of the profoundly damaging effects of internalized oppression within families on self-esteem. This left me feeling intense sorrow for the extensive wounding and harm caused by racism. I also experienced discomfort, fear and shame around my own racial conditioning in the awareness that however deeply I don’t want this conditioning, having grown up in this society, traces of it remain, and it is difficult and sometimes excruciating to come face-to-face with it. When one of the participants commented that since it is so difficult for black people to free themselves of the effects of their racial conditioning, it must also be true that it is perhaps just as difficult for white people to free themselves of their own racial conditioning – I felt so grateful for this empathic understanding.

Lerato: As I was preparing for the retreat, I had a lot of reasons for wanting to be there and I decided to go as a blank canvass. I was going to allow myself to be guided whilst also doing what felt good in my soul.

It was an unbelievable experience and answered to my wishes – I had always toyed with the idea of a silent retreat (I talk too much sometimes – hehehe), I wanted to meditate daily, I wanted to hear from other races their true experiences and all of these were actually granted. I also wanted to be facilitated by Nolitha (yea I did).

The methodology was new, frustrating at some points when time was up and we were still deep in discussion. Even with that, the discussions were targeted and I had to learn to say what I needed to say in the allocated time. In my years of doing diversity facilitation I have never learnt as much as I did at this weekend, the authenticity was rich, the stories real, the debates were interesting, the view points enlightening and the sharing of personal stories was heartfelt.

I was challenged by other “Black” stories as sometimes we take these for granted and we forget in true “privilege” mentality that we are individuals and not a collective. I was brought to my knees by the other races in the room. I came out with the knowledge that I need to believe what people say as we also grew up not believing others’ stories believing they were always “comfortable”.

This experience was good for my overall being. The different diet, the physical environment and the setting added to the ambiance that led me to further growth. Both the facilitators were amazing and I would like to thank the managers of Dharmagiri. I am thankful for the scholarships for me and the other participants as without them the interactions would not have been as wealthy. I would like to volunteer at the centre when there is a need. Please let me know so more people can pass through the centre and get the same experience.

I wish this experience for everyone in South Africa.

Jolanna: Experiencing the richness and wisdom that can sprout from the intention to be truly present with kindness and attention, is what made this Insight Dialogue retreat so great.  Experiencing the raw emotions and pain the history and present life in South Africa inflicts is what makes this dialogue so important.  May I continue to learn from this experience, and may this be the start of true change.

BuyiswaThank you very much for the opportunity to join the Retreat. For me it was a good chance to learn a lot of things in my life, to have a good communication with myself and to meet with good caring people.  I am looking forward to joining the Retreat again next year and I would like to say a big thank you to Annika and her husband for giving me the opportunity to be part of the Retreat.

Zak: This retreat took me through the whole gamut of emotions and reflections. I came in comfort, descended into self-doubt, questioned my place and role in the country, experienced realization, doubt, acceptance, peace, determination, doubt, peace, doubt, peace, excitement, doubt, despair, hope, peace, and doubt, all at once some times.

The format of the dialogues, beautifully facilitated, provided the right structure to deal with some very emotional topics in a way that brought out the emotions without allowing them to get overheated to the point of no longer listening to each other. There is no question that I learnt more about race, South Africa, and my own space (not role!) in it during this weekend than I have in the last five years.

As with any deep change, it’s difficult to fully express what I learnt in a few short lines, and particularly since a lot of what I learnt was doubt. I think I understand better my privilege, and my subliminal prejudices, and certainly I better understand the internal prejudices that other people hold, and how all of our differing narratives about social standing in South Africa cause us to maintain the status quo, as unuseful as that may be.

I guess the biggest take-away for me was that, as a white male, I have a role to play in rebalancing South Africa, but that role is not a leadership one, recreating my own position of privilege by another name. Rather, through recognising it and the pure luck of my birth, my role is to support and allow that narrative to change into something I probably won’t be comfortable with, and almost certainly won’t even understand, but which will see South Africa find a space that works for all of her.

Tshepiso: The weekend I spent at Dharmagiri was an emotionally moving and reflective time for me. I was nervous for the dialogue around the difficult topic of culture, race and identity, the nervousness stemmed from my intolerance of ignorance which often comes up whenever race is discussed. I found that the approach that was taken using insight dialogue was an effective method for diffusing the heated reactions that often result when we discuss race. I found myself listening more, breathing and in turn responding and engaging in a more controlled manner.

Oftentimes during the discussion I was angry and as I said to the fellow retreatants I believe that anger is not necessarily a bad thing, in fact I feel that as black South Africans we have every right to be angry. It’s what we do with that anger that determines its benefit to us, this is the aspect I have always grappled with, harnessing and controlling my anger so that it promotes effective dialogue and that’s what I felt Nolitha and Chandasara were so incredible at guiding us (me specifically) on. I am also grateful to my fellow retreatants for being open and honest with their views, it allowed us to all engage honestly with each other and consider various perspectives. The biggest thing I took away from this weekend was the amount of power that lies in silence and the necessity of reflection and meditation in our daily lives. Thank you Dharmagiri.

Claire:

White man

He pushes me away

He will not hold it

He wants all of this

But none of this

Big, strong, caring, kind

Protects by crushing, hushing, ties that bind

Sister AbeChandasara and Nolitha, I am failing to thank you enough for arranging this Retreat (Beyond  Identity). I learnt a lot about dealing with the challenges of racism during our growing up time. I felt that there was so much mental and Spiritual healing. The way the retreat was done it was so touching and deep. It was a  revelation for me or us!

JennyI had read about the Insight Dialogue on the Dharmagiri website and was immediately drawn to it but also very afraid. After making many excuses to myself about why I could not go, I found myself at Dharmagiri. It felt as if the dialogue started on the drive from the airport with 2 other participants. We had open, caring and interesting conversations which made me excited and less apprehensive. We shared intimate stories from our diverse backgrounds as we drove through the KwaZulu landscape of my childhood.

But my heart was in my mouth during the evening introductory session. I realised that I was very afraid of speaking. I am still trying to understand the depth of my fear but on the surface it was fear of saying something that may offend or that may cause people to judge me. So much of my recent reading and reflection had been around the need for white people to be quiet and to listen.

It soon became easy to let go of the written words and open my ears and heart to the people sitting in front of me. The process of the Insight Dialogue was gentle, inclusive and gave space for everyone to speak, which was part of the grace of the process.

We were a relatively diverse group of South Africans willing to talk about race, which is pretty special in our country right now and probably always has been. It was a place of stories and meeting across generations, races, privileges and locations. The intimacy of one-on-one dialogue, of watching our partners’ eyes and breathing, of deep listening and exploration of self, was both profoundly difficult and a joyful opening. I was carried by stories into new understandings of how others experience living in their skins, identities, families, communities and hearts. I was deeply unsettled by my ignorance, moved into a disrupted place, often battling to breathe and regulate my heart.

One of the suggestions made during the dialogue was that white people should engage in conversations around whiteness with other white people. To engage with that privilege and work out ways of responding to this in South Africa today. It is true and necessary but made me feel exhausted and resistant. I realised how much easier it is to talk with Black friends about whiteness and racism and privilege and that with white friends there is often defensiveness and a form  of guilt which I understand so keenly.

There was in the dialogue a generosity from Black women in the room. I particularly appreciated the young black women who gave me, a middle-aged woman, an insight into their lives and struggles. I was struck by the generosity and wisdom of each participant. We all had moments of being taught and of teaching. There was rage and anger and tiredness but the most precious of all, the personal stories of lived realities of South Africans.

One of the overwhelming feelings I had during and after the insight dialogue process was around guilt – white guilt. It is a multi-faceted, painful, complex and persistent ‘condition’. I want to let go of the guilt that comes with the awareness of being white in South Africa and in the wider world and to say that I have less guilt but that I embody the conditions I have been given in this life. And therein lies my responsibility. And I hope to find and create more opportunities for dialogue, for storytelling, for ritual, for action in order to live with more dignity and compassion. It was a very special time for me. We need so much more of these spaces in our country.

Dan: I described the retreat to one of my friends as ‘intense, challenging and rewarding’. I can’t deny I found it difficult at times. The one-on-one sessions using Insight Dialogue methods were great, even when I was hearing stuff that was disparaging about my own racial group or me personally. I found it useful to hear it, and the method of allowing us to share our beliefs and attitudes with regular pauses, quiet periods and feedback to each other was valuable.  My sense is that it enabled us to say things we wouldn’t normally say to one another, and to discuss the feelings that arise. This is where we need to be going as a nation, hopefully.

The group discussions had a slightly different dynamic: I found them really interesting and I learned a lot, but on the last night I wasn’t so happy with the way the discussion went. I guess I felt it was an affront to the way I saw myself, maybe a misunderstanding. Anyway, I got over it.

The assertion that all whites are racist is not helpful in my opinion.  It may well be true, but it’s not likely to encourage whites to reflect honestly about their attitudes, and to change them. I get the point about why black people can’t be racist (racism as institutionalised discrimination, inherent belief in superiority etc.) I have even argued this point with some of my friends recently, distinguishing between prejudice and racism. White people in SA probably have the capacity to change their attitudes, but are unlikely to do so if they are demonised. White people are scared, maybe a bit angry, resentful – perhaps they don’t deserve to have these feelings after all that has happened, but they do. Attitudes need to change amongst white people, but it has to be handled skilfully – by whom I’m not sure. I am reminded of the joke: how many psychologists does it take to change a lightbulb? One, but the lightbulb must want to change.

I have a better understanding into how people feel about many things – racism, identity, prejudice, humanity, forgiveness, love. There’s lots of work to be done amongst my lot, that’s for sure.

Thanks to everyone for their participation and warmth.

Keke: This Insight Dialogue experience arrived at a time when my soul was craving some form of nourishment. Working regularly with race dialogues had me spent and feeling exhausted and a little jaded.

The wisdom in the room, the shared experience of love and the desire for the healing of South Africa brought so much hope and a deep felt energy to carry on.

Although solutions or an ultimate solution is still something to work on, a spirit of endurance has been brought to life and that is something I’ve deeply embraced.

I’m so glad I went.

                                                                                                                                                                              

[1] The Insight Dialogue guidelines for both speaking and listening are:

Pause

Regular pausing interrupts the momentum of our involvement in what we are saying or listening to so we can be aware of our immediate experience – it invokes mindfulness

 

Relax

Helps bring about ease by releasing the tension we notice through pausing and helps us accept whatever it is we are experiencing

 

Open

Helps us to extend this ease and acceptance to the external – to what is around us and to what we are in contact with

 

Trust Emergence

Helps us to allow for the complexity of our ever-changing experience as it arises spontaneously in the moment from underlying causes

 

Listen Deeply

Here we allow our own internal dialogue and reactivity to die down so that we can be still enough inside to listen deeply

 

Speak the Truth

Here we commit ourselves to ethical speech, truth, kindness and consideration

 

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Growing Up Under Apartheid

You are growing into consciousness, and my wish for you is that you feel no need to constrict yourself to make other people comfortable.
― Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me

Nolitha and Chandasara discuss “growing up under apartheid”
& their June 16 – 19 retreat at Dharmagiri. Details of the retreat are below.

How would you articulate the essence of the impact of growing up within the Apartheid system? And what stays with you now?

Nolitha

Reflecting on this question what stands out is a feeling of confusion and fear I felt as a child. I grew up in a Catholic community, mixed racially. The church had 3 separate sitting nolithasections, one for White, Coloured and Black people. There were two separate schools, one for Coloured kids and another for Black kids. Teachers for the Coloured kids were White and Black for us. What stood out about this for me as a child was the other side had better amenities, (Coloured kids had a playground with swings, jungle gym and more, we only had a netball and soccer field). I never asked why? All I know is that as kids we were always envious of White and Coloured kids, they had all different kinds of privileges we did not have. I remember my younger brother who became an activist saying he would like to be White.

I have carried fear for White males for the longest time in my life, this comes from growing up with white police brutality. The worse thing for a child is seeing your parents harassed by white policeman for no good reason , this was common experience when we were travelling from the former homelands (Transkei) to SA. You could feel the fear in the car as we approached the border gate. Nobody would say anything about this. You were always treated with contempt by white people. This had a negative impact on my self-esteem, I associated whiteness with good and blackness with not good. Self-esteem is an ongoing personal journey for me. As an adult now I have an opportunity to develop friendship across race. This has been helpful in having an identity that goes beyond race to also being just human. The ongoing personal work I do allows me not to hold so tightly to what I call self. More and more I am experiencing self as a process rather than a fixed entity with one fixed identity.

Chandasara

One impact was a heightened awareness of racial identity and its social implications – that if you were white, you were generally treated respectfully by authorities and had access to more and better quality resources and conversely, if you were black, you were generally treated with contempt and had access far fewer and poorer quality resources. This naturally led to subtle psychological effects of unconsciously assumed privileges and higher social standing among whites and something of the opposite among blacks – achandasara questioning of self-worth and a sense of victimization, rejection and exclusion. We were all subjected to a kind of racial indoctrination and however we may now consciously reject such ideas, when you have been conditioned in this way, it is not so easy to free yourself of their effects, however deeply you may desire to do so.

A second impact was confusion about why this was as it was because there were so many contradictions in the society. Although South Africa was a self-proclaimed Christian and democratic society, the society was not based on the Christian teachings of love and sharing, but rather on fear, separation, prejudice, and greed – and the government was not democratic. Behaviour in relations between people of different races was often very distorted – ranging from many whites at times being overly arrogant, hostile and harsh towards blacks and many blacks at times being overly submissive and passive and sometimes silently collected like a threatening storm towards whites. As a child, I found this all very confusing and painful.

A third impact for myself, of growing up under Apartheid as a white person, was a deep questioning of my own identity as a result of belonging to a “settler” population whose sense of belonging was somewhat uncertain. Although I was born here and knew no other country as my own, there was a sense of white people having had to fight historically to establish a kind of nationhood here. This was not something automatic and therefore did not feel particularly secure. At the same time, the right to citizenship in the European countries of origin had lapsed so that there can be a sense of not really belonging anywhere on the planet. This is quite a subtle effect and not necessarily very conscious just as one can take very for granted a sense of rooted belonging to a place where one’s family has lived for many, many generations.

Chandasara & Nolitha

Why do you think this retreat is important and what do you hope this retreat will be able to offer participants?

This retreat is important because the personal or psychological effects of apartheid have not really been so much addressed yet. While the legal foundations for democratic political institutions have been established and there is greater social, geographic and economic integration, and some of the more extreme trauma of Apartheid was aired through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the more subtle effects of apartheid on us as South Africans and on our daily relationships with each other hasn’t really been addressed – and we are therefore not necessarily aware of the effects of our conditionings and behaviours on each other.

So we are hoping that in this retreat we can begin to glimpse each others’ experiences of our conditioning in relation to our racial identities through simply sharing stories about our experiences in relation to race as children, as adolescents, and as adults and begin to explore the impact of the telling of these stories on each other so that we can become more aware of each others’ pain, fear, sorrow, hopes, aspirations, desires. We hope that this might provide a doorway into each others’ subjective worlds so that we can begin to have a deeper dialogue about our relationships with one another and how we can ease the pain we cause each other through the history of our conditioning. In this way, we hope to open up new ways of relating that take us beyond these conditioned identities.

Who might this retreat be suitable for?

Anyone who is interested in finding ways to move beyond this conditioning and freeing themselves of it. For people of all races who have an interest in exploring the question of identity from the lens of race. We hope in so doing individuals can find compassion for what still needs to heal in this experience of growing up in a divided society.

Will it be relevant to the younger generation?

Certainly. Although the younger generation who are growing up in a post-Apartheid society are not affected in the same way as those of us who grew up under Apartheid, the legacy of Apartheid remains evident everywhere in the society. This is not meant to diminish in any way all the effort and energy that has been and is being put into changing the society, but it is acknowledging that the effects of Apartheid and in fact the racial segregationist policies that preceded Apartheid have had and continue to have a profound effect on all of us and that we need to talk more openly about this particularly as it affects our daily personal relationships with each other.

How will you approach the retreat, what kind of processes, practices, spaces do you want to offer?

The focus of this retreat will be on sharing our perceptions and experiences in relation to race from different stages of our lives. We have called this storytelling because it will probably involve sharing memories of various incidents in our lives. We will then provide some space for a dialogue around these sharings and the dialogue will be contained within a meditative context so that we can really speak our truth and listen attentively to each other. We will also provide a safe space, to hear all voices, and for exploring new stories and new expanded identities. There will also be some space for sharing poems or other writing that expresses something of the impact that racism has had on us in our experience and our lives.

RETREAT DETAIL

Beyond Identity: Exploring Race & Culture in S.Africa – June 16 – 19

Cost: R550 single, R500 – R450 shared per night + dana for teachers                                      Partial and Full Bursaries Available

Retreat Description – What was it like for you growing up in South Africa as Black or White, Coloured or Indian and when did you first experience yourself in terms of this identity? How did you perceive yourself and others of your own race, and how did you perceive people of different races? How did you feel about your life as a person of your own race? What did you think about the lives of other people of different races?

Are we ready for this dialogue? Can we share our perceptions and experiences related to our racial identities on a personal level? Can we go beneath the political, economic and ideological debates to explore and share the underlying personal experiences? Can this lead us towards greater understanding and help us to cultivate empathy in our relationships with each other?

We would like to offer this 3-day retreat as an opportunity to explore and share our own, and others, personal struggles, and experiences in relation to how our history and social conditioning defined us in terms of racial identities, and to provide an opportunity for cultivating empathy for individual and collective healing.

Using meditative dialogue as a means of providing a safe containing space for this exploration, this retreat will provide a structured format for dialogue based on the principles of mutual respect, mutual compassion, and a willingness to listen deeply and share truthfully. This form of dialogue is based on Insight Dialogue which is a structured and facilitated form that supports deepening awareness and change of habitual patterns of responding to and interacting with others.

Nolitha TsengiweCatholic by upbringing, has always been, even as a child, curious about “what truth is.” Her search for answers led her to become a practicing Buddhist. She is a Psychologist in private practice and an Executive Coach. In both roles, her primary task is to create a holding space for people who are also in search of truth as a doorway to freedom. Nolitha is a mother of a 15-year-old son, Singatha who is her teacher on how to be in the “here and now”. She is a facilitator in Biodanza ( Dance ) which is food for both heart and body, and a graduate of the Community Dharma Leader Program at Spirit Rock Meditation Centre, CA, USA.

Chandasaraspent her early adult life in political exile and later worked as a political analyst at the Centre for Policy Studies, Johannesburg. Chandasara trained as a Buddhist nun in the Forest School from 2003 to 2011 and after she left, completed an Honours degree in Psychology while residing at Emoyeni retreat centre. Since childhood, she has been deeply interested in all life and nature, intuitive sensitivity, spontaneity, play, creativity, and freedom. She currently resides at Dharmagiri Insight Meditation Centre where she enjoys exploring and sharing with others in the process of freeing ourselves.

“In this moment of meditation practice, you have the opportunity to observe yourself as you begin to speak. What self is speaking? At what point do you inhabit the role of “me”? What is it like to be that “me”? As you listen, are you listening through a filter of conditioning? Is that a self? I invite you to take the time in your practice to speak from silence and to listen deeply. What remains when you step out of roles, even for an instant?”
― Gregory Kramer, Insight Dialogue: The Interpersonal Path to Freedom